Book review – White Noise

White Noise (1984) is regarded as classic of modern literature. The attraction for me, however, was the author, Don DeLillo, whose novel Underworld impressed me enough to check out another of his books. Our chief protagonist is Jack Gladney, professor of Hitler studies at a provincial college. Gladney lives with his wife Babette and a throng of children from their present and past marriages. The book is seemingly about nothing in particular though one theme emerges in the form of death, as Jack and Babette share their fear of death and their fear of dying before or after the other.

Things get more interesting in the second part of the book, which is titled ‘The Airborne Toxic Event’, from which the American indie band took their name. Little did I know however that that realisation was to be my favourite moment of reading the book. The event in question is the result of a chemical spill in the vicinity of the family’s house, which forces the family to evacuate to temporary accommodation. On returning home (for the third part of the book) we become aware of how Babette’s fear of death has led to some ill-judged decisions which ultimately lead to even greater drama.

White Noise is apparently a critique of modern consumption, whether that be the consumption of media or physical goods. It also takes a shot at academia and the over-intellectualisation of things, which evinces itself in the simplest of things, e.g. whereby Jack and Babette refer to each other in the third person (which was especially annoying). While one could probably dissect the book in an intellectual fashion and marvel at DeLillo’s ability to satirise modern society, I found the characters to be shallow and loathsome with few redeeming qualities. Completing the book took some effort; while the change of the pace in the second part of the book was welcome, the third descends into farce, though there is a wonderful dialogue between Jack and a nun towards the end of the book.

Frankly, I couldn’t wait to get the book out of the way before I could move onto something which verged upon a plot, rather than a treatise wrapped in the shape of a novel! I wouldn’t recommend White Noise but there appear to be plenty of people who would.